Whole Body Cryotherapy

Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC) is a hypothermic application designed to reduce muscoloskeletal pain and inflammation. WBC stimulates the nervous system through skin receptors, causing dramatic peripheral vasoconstriction. This induces adaptive changes correlating with effects of analgesia, reduction of inflammation, and increases in tissue repair.

Cryotherapy is the process of rapidly cooling the body using liquid nitrogen. Each session is up to 3 minutes long, and has incredible health benefits. Individuals from various backgrounds are using WBC to recover, rejuvenate, and revive.

Fitness benefits:
Activates Natural Biological #Regeneration
Decreases Fatigue, #Soreness & #Inflammation
Accelerates #Recovery, Improves #Performance
Improves Sleep

Beauty benefits:
Increases Collagen Production
Reduces Cellulite & Skin Blemishes
Accelerates #Metabolism

Health benefits:
Boosts Immune System & #lymphaticsystem
Reduces Chronic Pain & #Fatigue
Treats #Autoimmune & Inflammation

In the Utah area there are four locations owned by Stone Cold Cryotherapy. Check them out: http://www.stonecoldcryo.com/

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is nothing new. Humans have fasted for most of their history, whether it’s during the typical overnight period, during more extended periods of food scarcity, or for religious reasons.
What is new is that clinical research on IF’s benefits for health and longevity is beginning to catch up.

Data show that IF, when done properly, might help extend life, regulate blood glucose, control blood lipids, manage body weight, gain (or maintain) lean mass, and more.

Rather than something we’re forced to endure – a result of poor food availability or cultural expectations – IF is becoming something that health and physique-oriented people are seeking out in order to keep their bodies in top shape.

The proposed benefits of IF in animals and humans read like a laundry list of “look better,” “feel better,” “live longer” physiological changes. These include:

REDUCED
blood lipids (including decreased triglycerides and LDL cholesterol)
blood pressure (perhaps through changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic activity)
markers of inflammation (including CRP<, IL-6, TNF, BDNF, and more)
oxidative stress (using markers of protein, lipid, and DNA damage)
risk of cancer (through a host of proposed mechanisms; we’ll save them for another review)

INCREASED
cellular turnover and repair (called autophagocytosis)
fat burning (increase in fatty acid oxidation later in the fast)
growth hormone release later in the fast (hormonally mediated)
metabolic rate later in the fast (stimulated by epinephrine and norepinephrine release)

IMPROVED
appetite control (perhaps through changes in PPY and ghrelin)
blood sugar control (by lowering blood glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity)
cardiovascular function (by offering protection against ischemic injury to the heart)
effectiveness of chemotherapy (by allowing for higher doses more frequently)
neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity (by offering protection against neurotoxins)

Source: http://www.precisionnutrition.com/intermittent-fasting/chapter-1

———————————————————————————————————————–

Sample:

Eat in 5-6 hour window (example 5pm-11pm)

During the day do this 2-3 times a day
1 scoop of Xtend BCAAs
5 grams glutamine
3 grams fish oils

Also during the day coffee, green tea and diet soda is fine. Sip water as well.

Post workout just have a low/no carb protein.

Every night meal should be:
150-175 grams of protein
150 grams carbs
90 grams of fat
Use MyFitnessPal to help with your macros for you feeding time.

Inflammation can fan the flames of depression

Chronic inflammation in the bloodstream can ‘fan the flames’ of depression, much like throwing gasoline on a fire, according to a new paper from researchers at Rice University and Ohio State University.

‘Inflammation: Depression Fans the Flames and Feasts on the Heat’ appeared in a recent edition of the American Journal of Psychiatry. The study reviewed 200 existing papers on depression and inflammation.

“In the health area of psychology at Rice, we’re very focused on the intersection of health behavior, psychology and medicine,” said Christopher Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology and co-author of the paper. “One thing that we’re particularly interested in is how stress affects the immune system, which in turn affects diseases and mental health outcomes, the focus of this paper.”

The authors found that in addition to being linked to numerous physical health issues, including cancer and diabetes, systemic inflammation is linked to mental health issues such as depression. Among patients suffering from clinical depression, concentrations of two inflammatory markers, CRP and IL-6, were elevated by up to 50 percent.

Fagundes said chronic inflammation is most common in individuals who have experienced stress in their lives, including lower socio-economic status or those who experienced abuse or neglect as children. Other contributing factors are a high-fat diet and high body mass index.

“Previous research shows that individuals who have socio-economic issues or had problems in their early lives are already at higher risk for mental issues because of these stresses in their lives,” Fagundes said. “As a result, they often experience a higher occurrence of chronic inflammation, which we have linked to depression.”

He said that it is normal for humans to have an inflammatory response — such as redness — to an area of the body that is injured.

“This is your immune system working to kill that pathogen, which is a good thing,” Fagundes said. “However, many individuals exhibit persistent systemic inflammation, which we’re finding is really the root of all physical and mental diseases. Stress, as well as poor diet and bad health behaviors, enhances inflammation.”

Fagundes noted that a strong support system early in life is critical in helping individuals learn to deal with stress later in life.

The study also found that depression caused by chronic inflammation is resistant to traditional therapy methods, but can be treated with activities such as yoga, meditation NSAIDS and exercise.

Fagundes hopes the study will shed light on the dangers of bodily inflammation and the steps that can be taken to overcome this health issue.

He is starting a five-year $3.7 million bereavement study to examine how inflammation impacts depression and disease among those who recently lost a spouse in hopes of finding better ways to treat bereaved older adults.

“We still have a lot to learn about how inflammation impacts depression, but we are making progress,” he said “We hope one day this work will lead to new treatments that are part of standard psychiatric care.”

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Rice University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser, Heather M. Derry, Christopher P. Fagundes. Inflammation: Depression Fans the Flames and Feasts on the Heat. American Journal of Psychiatry, 2015; 172 (11): 1075 DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.15020152